Daylesford Discusses is a series of friendly, open format events where we bring together a panel of experts to highlight and debate a variety of issues around food, health, wellbeing, sustainability, balance and conscious choices.

The next event will be at our Notting Hill farmshop and will be a discussion on debunking food myths. The inspiration for this particular topic is our love for real food – organic, fresh, sustainable and good for us. However, with many myths and incorrect facts out there about food and diet, we want to discuss popular myths and set the record straight.

We are delighted to be welcoming to our panel:

We expect the discussion to cover questions such as are carbs bad for you, is breakfast important, is gluten free better, are oranges the best natural source of vitamin C, is low fat better and do eggs give you heart disease?

This event is free, but please do register your attendance to help us keep track of numbers. Please mark your diaries for what is sure to be an informative, fun and inspiring evening.


DATE: Monday 18th November 2019

LOCATION: Daylesford Notting Hill,208-212 Westbourne Grove, Notting Hill, London W11 2RH

TIMINGS: 6:30pm – 8.30pm

BOOKING: Free event, please register your attendance below to help us keep track of numbers.

Register for free

Dr Hazel Wallace is the founder of The Food Medic, an educational platform aimed at bridging the gap between traditional medical advice, nutrition and other areas of lifestyle. She is also an NHS doctor specialising in nutrition after finishing her masters in nutrition and public health and is a best-selling author, with her second book The Food Medic for Life: Easy Recipes being widely acclaimed. On top of this, she is also a qualified personal trainer.

@thefoodmedic

Rosie Saunt is co-author of best-selling book Is Butter a Carb? Described by The Sunday Times as ‘nutritional sanity’, her book helps debunk some of the most popular myths surrounding food, diets and nutrition. Rosie is also a registered dietitian with a special interest in sci-comms (science communication) and is co-founder of The Rooted Project, an award-winning enterprise which aims to make evidence-based nutrition accessible via events, public speaking, social media and writing. 

@rooted_project

Jenna Hope is a nutritionist with a first class undergraduate degree and a masters in nutrition. She is an avid foodie who believes food should never be boring and should always be enjoyable and nutritious. Having worked with leading brands such as ASOS, Google, Phillips and many more, Jenna is also a regular contributor to media outlets such as This Morning, Sky News, ITV News and Women’s Health. She also co-founded The Yoghurt & Juice Network, a company that specialises in nutrition education in schools, colleges and universities, with the idea that nutrition should be taught from a young age and should be inclusive for all.

@jennahopenutrition

Our good friend, chef and cookery book author Alexandra Dudley joins our panel with expertise in food preparation, nutrition and cooking. Alexandra has a relaxed approach in the kitchen and celebrates ‘zero waste cooking’. She is also the monthly recipe columnist for Town & Country Magazine, is a regular contributor at Table Magazine and has catered retreats around the world. A ‘serial dinner party host’, Alexandra is a true entertainer and her debut cookbook Land and Sea: Secrets to Simple, Sustainable, Sensational Food has received widespread shining reviews.

@alexandradudley

Rhaya Jordan has been practicing for 30 years as a naturopath, nutritional therapist and herbalist and is Daylesford’s resident nutritionist and wellness expert. She was the Naturopathic Director of Blackmores UK, training practitioners and holding seminars before leaving to join the University of Westminster where she helped write the Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Therapy and lecture in Health Sciences. She was also involved in setting up the largest complementary health training clinic in Europe and holds a post-graduate certificate in higher education. These experiences, coupled with her years of teaching and clinic, have her build on her dedication of helping people normalise their relationship with food.